Cambridge Civic Journal Forum

November 18, 2019

Lame Duck Walking – November 18, 2019 Cambridge City Council meeting

Lame Duck Walking – November 18, 2019 Cambridge City Council meeting

Lame DuckIn between the inevitable hushed meetings to secure the necessary five votes to become mayor for the 2020-21 term, the lame duck session continues quacking. The agenda is quite short, but a few items worth noting are listed below. Honestly, I’ve been having more fun studying the 2019 ballot data now that the election results were finalized Friday evening [Council][School]. This includes things like the ward/precinct distribution of #1 votes [Council][School], the #2 vote distribution behind each candidate’s #1 votes [Council][School], who would replace each of the newly elected members in the event of a future vacancy, and an Instant Runoff simulation to see how the ballots would choose a mayor (which, of course, is not how it’s done!). Anyway, back to the Council agenda (with minimal comment)…..

Manager’s Agenda #5. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to a Planning Board recommendation to adopt with comments and suggested improvements, the CambridgeSide Galleria Associates Trust Zoning Petition.

Manager’s Agenda #6. Transmitting Communication from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of $4,475,844.18 from Free Cash to the Mitigation Revenue Stabilization Fund which will be used to fund specific future projects, requiring individual appropriations by the City Council at a later date.


Manager’s Agenda #10. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to a Planning Board recommendation to adopt the Exterior Building Insulation Zoning Petition.

Committee Report #3. A report from Councillor Dennis J. Carlone Co-Chair of the Ordinance Committee, for a public hearing held on Nov 12, 2019 to discuss the Insulation Zoning proposal A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to a petition to amend provisions in Article 5.000 and Article 22.000 pertaining to setback requirements and exterior building insulation.


Manager’s Agenda #11. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to a Planning Board recommendation to adopt Article 22 Green Building Requirements Zoning Petition.

Committee Report #2. A report from Councillor Dennis J. Carlone Chair of the Ordinance Committee, for a public hearing held on Nov 12 at 12pm to discuss Green Building requirements A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to a petition to amend provisions in Section 22.20, which governs Green Building Requirements, and also applicable definitions contained in Article 2.000.


Order #2. That the City Manager is requested to direct the Traffic, Parking and Transportation Department to fully restore sharrows to Broadway, alongside the new door-zone bike lane, as a reminder to motorists that cyclists are always allowed to take the full lane.   Councillor Zondervan

I completely agree with this Order (as a person who prefers biking along with other traffic on most roads with ordinary speeds), but I continue to marvel at the trend among city councillors to assume roles which previously were the domain of the professional staff. I can’t decide if this is great wisdom or micromanagement or just a vote of "no confidence" of City staff.

Committee Report #1. A report from Vice Mayor Jan Devereux, Chair of the Government Operations, Rules & Claims Committee, for a public meeting held on Nov 14, 2019 to discuss the Solicitor’s Response to Policy Order O-9 from the June 10, 2019 City Council Meeting.

I used to be somewhat agnostic regarding campaign donations from people with business before the City Council, but the recent municipal election campaign has pushed me into the camp of those who feel that some limitations should be the rule. I’m still not convinced that public financing of municipal election campaigns would be worth it either practically or bureaucratically. I also can’t wrap my head around the fact that some of our local elected officials (and their ardent supporters) feel outrage about the Citizens United court decision that opened the floodgates in campaign spending yet have no qualms whatsoever in doing the same thing at the local level. – Robert Winters

November 14, 2019

CRLS, CHLS & Rindge Homecoming 2019

Filed under: Cambridge,schools — Tags: , , , , , — Robert Winters @ 8:45 am

CRLS, CHLS & RINDGE HOMECOMING 2019

A series of events for alumni and staff of CRLS, CHLS and Rindge Tech beginning Saturday, November 9, 2019 through Sunday, December 1.

CRLSEVENTS:

MUSICAL: Saturday, 11/09, Sunday 11/10, Friday 11/22, Saturday 11/23 and Sunday Matinee 11/24 – CRLS Musical "Sister Act" – 7:00pm @ the Fitzgerald Theater, Broadway, Cambridge MA with Alumni Night, Saturday 11/23

PANEL DISCUSSION: Tuesday, 11/26 -"Fifth Annual Alumni Panel Discussion" for CRLS Jrs and Srs at CRLS during first and second block for CRLS Juniors and Seniors

ALUMUNI REUNION NIGHT: "In the Square" Wednesday, 11/27/2019 from 8:00-12:00 midnight @ Hong Kong Restaurant, 1238 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138 Free Hors d’oeuvres. Free Drink to the first 100!

HOMECOMING FOOTBALL GAME: Thursday, 11/28/2019 – CRLS vs Somerville at Russel Field @ 10am, Cambridge (Tickets available at Gate)

ALUMNI SOCCER GAME: Friday, 11/29/2019 – Danehy Field 4, starting at 10:00am

REUNIONS:

ALUMUNI REUNION NIGHT: "In the Square" Wednesday, 11/27/2019 from 8:00-12:00 midnight @ Hong Kong Restaurant, 1238 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138 Free Hors d’oeuvres. Free Drink to the first 100!

LINKS:
Alumni Website: http://www.crlsalumni.org/
EventBrite Homecoming 2019: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/chls-crls-and-rindge-tech-2019-homecoming-tickets-80188769769
Contact: Andy Farrar: af@handsontoys.com

November 13, 2019

Cambridge InsideOut Episodes 431-432: November 12, 2019

Episode 431 – Cambridge InsideOut: Nov 12, 2019 (Part 1)

This episode was broadcast on Nov 12, 2019 at 5:30pm. Topics: Municipal election results; effectiveness of slates; role of major issues (if any); what’s next. Hosts: Robert Winters, Patrick Barrett [On YouTube] [audio]


Episode 432 – Cambridge InsideOut: Nov 12, 2019 (Part 2)

This episode was broadcast on Nov 12, 2019 at 6:00pm. Topics: Election last details; Harvard Square Zoning Petition; where do we go from here. Hosts: Robert Winters, Patrick Barrett [On YouTube] [audio]

[Materials used in these episodes]

November 11, 2019

Current City of Cambridge Board and Commission Vacancies (Nov 11, 2019)

Filed under: Cambridge,Cambridge government — Tags: — Robert Winters @ 2:40 pm

Members Sought to fill Upcoming Vacancies in Recycling Advisory Committee

City SealCity Manager Louis A. DePasquale is seeking Cambridge residents, business owners, and local professionals interested in serving on the Recycling Advisory Committee (RAC) beginning in January 2020.

The RAC is a volunteer committee which provides advice, recommendations, and assistance to the Department of Public Works (DPW) regarding recycling, composting, reuse, and waste reduction. The RAC does this through research, feedback, public outreach, and event planning. The RAC has been instrumental in the city’s new Zero Waste Master Plan, Fix-It Clinics, marketing and education, and other important initiatives that have made Cambridge a national leader in waste reduction.

Cambridge Recycling began in 1989 with a few volunteers dedicated to beginning a recycling drop-off program. Today, the city recovers more than 11,000 tons per year of recyclables from more than 44,000 households. Approximately 32,000 households have access to curbside composting, reducing the city’s trash by more than 7% in the first year of citywide composting. More households will be added to the program over time. The City now serves 123 businesses in the Small Business Recycling Pilot. Lastly, the RAC is working on a Single-Use Plastics regulation in conjunction with the Cambridge City Council and the Department of Public Works.

Currently, the city’s goals to reduce waste match those in the MA Solid Waste Master Plan. Using 2008 as a baseline year, the city aims to reduce trash 30% by 2020 and 80% by 2050. As of 2018, the city has reduced trash by 28%.

The Committee has been active for over 20 years and consists of at least nine members with a demonstrated interest in the topics listed above. Members serve a three-year term and are expected to attend monthly meetings (Sept-June). The city seeks members that represent local businesses and property managers, Cambridge residents, and users of the Recycling Center, universities, non-profit organizations and social service agencies whose goals overlap with waste reduction.

Duties, Responsibilities and Minimum Requirements include:recycling symbol

  • Attend and participate in monthly meeting, held the second Wednesday of the month (September-June) at 8am, at Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Ave., Sullivan Chamber, 2nd Floor. Enter through back door of City Hall.
  • Participate in creating committee direction and implementation of ideas
  • Take a leadership role in projects, such as doing research, organizing & attending events, and advocacy.
  • Work with the Public Works Recycling Division, Climate Protection Action Committee, and other appropriate City staff to provide feedback on City initiatives.
  • Research different approaches to communication, education and best practices for recycling, composting, reuse and waste reduction programs.
  • Disseminate outreach materials and educate the community
  • Write articles or blogs to promote Cambridge recycling.
  • Initiate, plan, attend and run events to promote recycling, composting, reuse and waste reduction
  • Meet with the community and participate in at least 2-3 events, such as Danehy Park Family Day, Public Works Week events, Fresh Pond Day, May Fair, block parties

Helpful Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

  • Marketing
  • Outreach and community engagement
  • Project Management
  • Advocacy for state policies
  • Familiarity with Cambridge Public Schools

To learn more about the committee’s work, please consider attending an upcoming meeting, on Oct 16 or Nov 13. For more information, contact Michael Orr, Recycling Director, at 617-349-4815 or morr@cambridgema.gov. The deadline for submitting applications is November 15, 2019. Applications can be submitted to City Manager Louis A. DePasquale using the City’s online application system at cambridgema.gov/apply. A cover letter and resume or applicable experience can be submitted during the online application process. Paper applications are available in the City Manager’s Office at Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue.


Member Sought for Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust – Application Deadline Extended

City SealCambridge City Manager Louis A. DePasquale is seeking residents who are interested in serving on the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust.

The Affordable Housing Trust administers and oversees city funds allocated to create and preserve affordable rental and homeownership housing, and to support housing programs that address the city’s affordable housing needs. The Trust members review proposals for new housing preservation, development efforts, and other housing programs, and provide housing policy and program advice to the City Manager, city staff, other city boards and commissions, and the Cambridge City Council.

The Trust is comprised of members with experience in affordable housing, housing policy, finance, development, planning, and design. The Trust is chaired by the City Manager and generally meets on the fourth Thursday of every month, from 4-5:30pm, at Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue.

The deadline for submitting applications is Friday, Nov 1, 2019. Applications can be submitted to City Manager Louis A. DePasquale using the city’s online application system at cambridgema.gov/apply. A cover letter and resume or applicable experience can be submitted during the online application process. Paper applications are available in the City Manager’s Office at Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue.


Member Sought to Fill Cambridge Library Board of Trustees Vacancy – Application Deadline Extended

City SealCity Manager Louis A. DePasquale is seeking to fill a vacancy on the Board of Trustees for the Cambridge Public Library.

Library trustees are volunteer community representatives, library advocates, and leaders in the establishment of goals and policies for the Cambridge Public Library system. Trustees are a vital link between the library staff and the community and work to ensure the quality of library services, collections, and programs, and to make certain that the library reflects and is relevant to the community.

Trustees serve a 3 year term and are expected to attend monthly board meetings, committee and community meetings, appropriate continuing education workshops or conferences, and library programs as their schedules allow.

Ideal candidates will have an interest in and passion for public libraries and an understanding of the importance of the public library as a center of information, culture, recreation, and life-long learning in the community. Candidates should also have knowledge of the community, including an awareness of diverse social and economic conditions, needs and interests of all groups. Strong verbal and written communication skills, including public speaking skills are required. Trustees work productively as a team. It is also important for candidates to understand how the role of the public library is evolving and how information technology and societal changes inform the library’s future.

The deadline for submitting applications is October 22, 2019. Applications can be submitted to City Manager Louis A. DePasquale using the City’s online application system at cambridgema.gov/apply. A cover letter and resume or applicable experience can be submitted during the online application process. Paper applications are available in the City Manager’s Office at Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue. For more information about the role of Library trustees, contact Maria McCauley, Director of Libraries at 617-349-4032.


Members Sought for Cambridge Citizens’ Committee on Civic Unity – Application Deadline Extended

City SealCambridge City Manager Louis A. DePasquale is seeking members of the community who live and/or work in Cambridge (including private sector and municipal employees, business owners, students, and others) to become a part of the Citizens’ Committee on Civic Unity. Applications from interested community members are welcome through October 18, 2019.

The mission of the City of Cambridge Citizens’ Committee on Civic Unity is to foster fairness, equity, unity, appreciation, and mutual understanding across all people and entities in Cambridge. The Citizens’ Committee on Civic Unity works to provide opportunities for constructive discussions and community events regarding race, class, religion, gender, disability, and sexual orientation, through recognizing and raising awareness of historic, existing and potential civic issues; providing opportunities for honest dialogue and engagement; and by building bridges across communities to better understand and connect with one another.

The Committee generally meets monthly. Committee meetings are open to the public and may include presentations by guest speakers, city staff, and various experts. For information on the committee’s work, current goals, meeting schedule, and events, please visit: www.cambridgema.gov/civicunity

Applications can be submitted to City Manager Louis A. DePasquale using the City’s online application system at cambridgema.gov/apply. A cover letter and resume or applicable experience can be submitted during the online application process. Paper applications are available in the City Manager’s Office at Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue. Once your application is submitted, you will receive a confirmation email. Applications are due by Friday, Oct 18, 2019.

If you have question about the application process, please contact the City Manager’s Office at 617-349-4300 or fgaines@Cambridgema.gov.


Digital Equity Working Group Members Sought – Application Deadline Extended

City SealCity Manager Louis A. DePasquale is seeking residents to fill two positions on the City Manager’s Digital Equity Working Group. This administrative working group will provide input and guidance to the City Manager and staff at key milestones during the City’s yearlong study of digital equity in the Cambridge. The working group will assist in creating a draft vision and set of goals to inform the City’s digital equity strategy. Additionally, the working group, based on the findings of the study and research of best practices and regional efforts, will help develop targeted strategies the City could take to address digital equity in Cambridge.

The working group will meet quarterly with the possibility of 3-4 additional meetings. The term of this working group is one year.

Applications to serve on the City Manager’s Digital Divide Working Group can be submitted to City Manager Louis A. DePasquale using the City’s online application system at cambridgema.gov/apply. A cover letter and resume or relevant experience  or interest may be submitted during the online application process. Paper applications are available in the City Manager’s Office at Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue. The deadline to submit an application is Friday, October 11, 2019.

November 4, 2019

The Last Thing on their Minds – Nov 4, 2019 Cambridge City Council meeting

The Last Thing on their Minds – Nov 4, 2019 Cambridge City Council meeting

CountdownThis is your classic night-before-Election-Day City Council meeting where Council business places a distant second behind concerns about having all their incumbency protection ducks in a row. If this meeting goes beyond 6:15pm it will likely be because they were forced to listen to the repetitive whining of Public Comment. Anyway, here is my very short list of interesting items on this very short agenda:

Manager’s Agenda #3. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to the creation of a new municipal Renewable Energy and Greenhouse Gas (“GHG”) Reduction Revolving Fund (“Revolving Fund”) to serve the City of Cambridge’s (“City”) municipal energy aggregation, and adoption of the proposed new ordinance, Chapter 3.24, entitled “Departmental Revolving Funds.”

From the Manager’s letter: "The Aggregation adder is expected to raise approximately $650,000 annually, or a total of $1.3 million during the current supplier contract period (January 2019 – December 2020)." Proposed uses are: (a) Invest $1.3 million in a solar energy project located on a municipal building; and (b) Deposit income earned from the sale of generated Net Metering Credits annually into the Revolving Fund. Those funds would subsequently be used to finance other solar energy/renewable energy projects and all resulting GHG reductions would be attributed to the Aggregation’s participants.

Seems like a reasonable plan of action.

Charter Right #1. That the City Manager is requested to confer with relevant City staff on determining the most appropriate signage and messaging that would best educate cyclists on the importance of following traffic laws, particularly stopping at red lights, for their own safety and the safety of other cyclists and pedestrians.

30 out of 31 Communications in which cyclists recoil in horror because a City Council Order from last week suggested "signage and messaging that would best educate cyclists on the importance of following traffic laws, particularly stopping at red lights, for their own safety and the safety of other cyclists and pedestrians."

Only in Cambridge would a resolution calling for enhanced safety yield an avalanche of protest. The turf wars continue.

Resolution #5. Congratulations to Sekazi K. Mtingwa.   Councillor Simmons

Sekazi and I worked together at MIT. I did the math and he did the physics in the MIT Concourse program. I’m glad to see him getting the recognition.

Brattle RoundaboutOrder #3. That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the Council by the end of this term on progress toward identifying a source of funding and a timetable for the design and construction of a modern roundabout at the Brattle-Sparks-Craigie intersection, to share the consultant’s 2017-18 report on the feasibility of a modern roundabout, and to schedule a community meeting in early 2020 to further discuss this project.   Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Zondervan, Mayor McGovern, Councillor Carlone

I don’t know whether or not this is the best alternative for this intersection but it is an interesting proposal. I don’t like the way it "pedestrianizes" cyclists and I would likely just ride through the roundabout with the rest of the traffic. It’s a bit strange that the Council Order calls for a source of funding and a timetable for the design and construction prior to there being any decision on even doing such a redesign, but it’s fair to say that this isn’t the first instance of engineering via politics by this Council.

Order #5. Resolution in support of the Harvard Graduate Students Union-UAW’S demands for a fair contract now.   Councillor Siddiqui, Mayor McGovern, Councillor Simmons, Councillor Mallon

Finish your thesis, kids. There are better opportunities than being an ABD (All But Dissertation) graduate student. I’ll add that it still seems funny that the United Auto Workers are representing Harvard Graduate students.

99 Items Awaiting Report (sung to the tune of "99 Bottles of Beer on the Wall")

Wouldn’t it be just marvelous if one of these weeks one of the councillors simply asked the manager to run through the list and say (a) which items he has no intention of reporting (possibly because it’s either moot or ridiculous); (b) which items somebody somewhere is actually working on; and (c) which items he considers to be timely and important. For example, should we all be waiting with bated breath on the future of wood-fired ovens or electronic device usage by City-elected officials? I thought that the request for "a comprehensive, independent planning, and parking study of the neighborhood and use of the First Street Garage" had already been completed. Would it be so difficult to report on the "feasibility of allowing small businesses to host live acoustic music performances without a license?" Can anyone shed any light on the proposed Outdoor Lighting Ordinance that has apparently gone missing? – Robert Winters

November 1, 2019

Follow the Money – Cambridge City Council Campaign Receipts 2019

Filed under: 2019 election,Cambridge,campaign finance,City Council — Tags: , , , — Robert Winters @ 11:00 pm

Why do labor unions pour so much money into City Council campaign coffers?

Money![Originally posted Aug 15, updated periodically] – One thing I have always found puzzling is the amount of money donated to the campaign accounts of incumbent city councillors. I suppose this could be interpreted as financial support for those who have supported unions in their noble quest for better wages, benefits, and working conditions, but the fact is that all incumbents and challengers appear to share this sentiment. So perhaps it’s something different. There is a longstanding pattern of labor representatives being recruited by some of the larger real estate developers to speak in favor of new development – supposedly because of the jobs involved, but that always struck me as too simplistic. Many of the people who control the funds of these political action committees are, to say the least, politically connected.

There’s also the matter of political contributions from people tied to real estate development. This is always difficult to evaluate because of the simple fact that it’s very difficult, if not impossible, to determine motive. There are people who have been generous charitable contributors for ages who also happen to own and/or develop Cambridge real estate. Are their contributions related to their real estate interests or not?

Of course, there’s also the matter of whether or not contributions come from Cambridge residents. It’s not always easy to draw conclusions from this – primarily because some candidates have family and friends scattered across the rest of the state and the country.

Here’s a revised account of the (a) Cambridge contributions, (b) union contributions, (c) real estate contributions (as best as I could discern), and (d) total of union and real estate money contributed over this election cycle starting from Feb 1, 2018 through the latest data available for all City Council candidates (notes: – receipts include loans from candidates to their campaigns; refunds deducted if clearly a refund):

Table of reported City Council campaign receipts (Feb 1, 2018 - present) - Total, Cambridge, Unions, Real Estate - updated Nov 18, 11:32pm
Candidate (and PACs)ReceiptsCambridgePctunionsPctReal EstatePctunions+REPct
Total $677,093.51 $427,981.7863.2% $42,250.006.2% $67,751.0010.0% $110,001.0016.2%
McGovern, Marc C. $106,951.21 $46,608.0043.6% $12,550.0011.7% $30,200.0028.2% $42,750.0040.0%
Simmons, E. Denise $63,371.19 $30,751.1948.5% $6,250.009.9% $20,100.0031.7% $26,350.0041.6%
Toomey, Timothy J., Jr. $55,875.81 $31,573.5856.5% $4,600.008.2% $10,750.0019.2% $15,350.0027.5%
Mallon, Alanna $41,195.25 $27,612.2567.0% $6,450.0015.7% $1,900.004.6% $8,350.0020.3%
Siddiqui, Sumbul $30,064.68 $18,186.6860.5% $4,250.0014.1% $350.001.2% $4,600.0015.3%
Musgrave, Adriane $41,308.35 $20,624.3549.9% $3,700.009.0% $600.001.5% $4,300.0010.4%
Kelley, Craig A. $33,504.00 $26,772.0079.9% $2,500.007.5% $1,650.004.9% $4,150.0012.4%
ABC - PAC $24,259.26 $20,207.2383.3% $ -0.0% $1,866.007.7% $1,866.007.7%
Carlone, Dennis $32,173.00 $25,698.0079.9% $500.001.6% $250.000.8% $750.002.3%
Mednick, Risa $19,237.00 $13,854.0072.0% $500.002.6% $ - 0.0% $500.002.6%
Sobrinho-Wheeler, Jivan $27,330.00 $18,610.4268.1% $500.001.8% $ - 0.0% $500.001.8%
Azeem, Burhan $13,199.35 $10,494.3579.5% $450.003.4% $35.000.3% $485.003.7%
Williams, Nicola A. $27,272.59 $20,413.5274.8% $ -0.0% $ 50.000.2%$ 50.000.2%
Akiba, Sukia $3,000.00 $980.0032.7% $ -0.0% $ -0.0% $ -0.0%
BikeSafety-PAC $3,230.00 $1,905.0059.0% $ -0.0% $ -0.0% $ -0.0%
CCC - PAC $19,055.00 $18,175.0095.4% $ -0.0% $ -0.0% $ -0.0%
CResA - PAC $2,905.00 $2,905.00100.0% $ -0.0% $ -0.0% $ -0.0%
Franklin, Charles $31,321.55 $20,253.5564.7% $ -0.0% $ - 0.0% $ - 0.0%
Kopon, Derek Andrew $8,203.71 $6,817.6683.1% $ -0.0% $ - 0.0% $ - 0.0%
Levy, Ilan S. $ 450.00 $ 450.00100.0% $ -0.0% $ - 0.0% $ - 0.0%
McNary, Jeffery $ - $ - - $ -- $ - - $ - -
Moree, Gregg J. $ 1,500.00 $ 1,500.00100.0% $ -0.0% $ - 0.0% $ - 0.0%
Nolan, Patricia M. $21,961.23 $13,555.0061.7% $ -0.0% $ - 0.0% $ - 0.0%
ORC - PAC $1,992.00 $1,892.0095.0% $ -0.0% $ -0.0% $ -0.0%
Pitkin, John $14,072.00 $12,172.0086.5% $ -0.0% $ - 0.0% $ - 0.0%
Simon, Ben $12,540.33 $6,892.0055.0% $ -0.0% $ - 0.0% $ - 0.0%
Zondervan, Quinton $41,121.00 $29,079.0070.7% $ -0.0% $ - 0.0% $ - 0.0%

Source: Massachusetts Office of Campaign and Political Finance (OCPF)

ABC-PAC: “A Better Cambridge Political Action Committee”
BikeSafety-PAC: “Cambridge Bicycle Safety Independent Expenditure Political Action Committee”
CCC-PAC: “Cambridge Citizens Coalition Political Action Committee”
CResA-PAC: “Democracy for Cambridge Political Action Committee” – Cambridge Residents Alliance
ORC-PAC: “Our Revolution Cambridge Political Action Committee”

2019 Cambridge City Council Campaign Bank Reports

Filed under: 2019 election,Cambridge,campaign finance,City Council — Tags: , , , — Robert Winters @ 10:51 pm

The following table shows the summary bank reports (Feb 2018 to present) for 2019 Cambridge City Council candidates and active local political action committees involved in the municipal election. These reports are updated at the middle and at the end of every month. You can sort by any of the fields shown by clicking on the field name – one click ascending and second click descending. #1 Votes and $/Vote fields added Nov 10 and will be updated as bills continue to be paid.

CandidateToStartReceiptsExpendBalanceAs Of#1 Votes$/VoteNotes
PAC - ABC11/15/190.0021396.4119196.382200.0311/18/19--A Better Cambridge
PAC - CCC10/31/190.0016900.2411739.355160.8911/05/19--Cambridge Citizens Coalition
PAC - CResA11/15/190.003166.771637.911528.8611/18/19--Cambridge Residents Alliance
PAC - Cambr. Bike Safety07/15/190.000.000.000.0007/15/19--Cambridge Bike Safety
PAC - Our Revolution Cambridge11/15/190.001427.001367.0060.0011/18/19--filed 10/9/19 w/OCPF
Akiba, Sukia10/31/190.003000.031738.181261.8511/04/19362 $4.80
Azeem, Burhan10/31/190.0012979.5811938.161041.4211/04/19961 $12.42new candidate, May 7
Carlone, Dennis10/31/1910088.5829068.3322556.5416600.3711/05/191479 $15.25
Franklin, Charles11/15/190.0032297.7130266.692031.0211/18/19323 $93.70new candidate, Mar 5
Kelley, Craig11/15/194951.6532650.3028649.488952.4711/18/191422 $20.15
Kopon, Derek10/31/190.009047.277973.841073.4311/05/19493 $16.17new candidate, July 2
Levy, Ilan11/15/19-44.32650.51517.4188.7811/18/19110 $4.70
Mallon, Alanna10/31/195380.4540515.3738248.677647.1511/04/191256 $30.45refund deducted
McGovern, Marc11/15/196376.17101390.2185942.7421823.6411/19/191621 $53.02$600 refund deducted
McNary, Jeffery10/31/190.000.000.000.0011/01/1977 $0.00will not raise/expend funds
Mednick, Risa11/15/190.0019618.9916171.283447.7111/18/19244 $66.28new candidate, July 15
Moree, Gregg10/31/190.001500.001427.1072.9011/05/1947 $30.36
Musgrave, Adriane10/31/19474.6738370.1633149.405695.4311/05/19726 $45.66
Nolan, Patty11/15/190.0022587.0216059.166527.8611/18/191685 $9.53new candidate, June 11
Pitkin, John11/15/190.0014041.686442.567599.1211/18/19536 $12.02new candidate, July 17
Siddiqui, Sumbul11/15/199334.0533594.4823020.4619908.0711/18/192516 $9.15
Simmons, Denise11/15/197595.5062715.1651485.0918825.5711/18/192007 $25.65
Simon, Ben11/15/190.0012145.9510989.411156.5411/18/19294 $37.38new candidate, Apr 2
Sobrinho-Wheeler, Jivan C.11/15/190.0026346.5525624.74721.8111/18/191321 $19.40new candidate, Mar 11
Toomey, Tim11/15/1910024.4961559.9851561.1020023.3711/18/191729 $29.82$15,000 repaid loan deducted
Williams, Nicola A.11/15/190.0029868.3527919.911948.4411/18/19631 $44.25new candidate, Mar 12
Zondervan, Quinton11/15/191279.6645545.8043892.802932.6611/18/191382 $31.76
Summaries of potential 2019 City Council campaign bank reports. Adjustments to the totals have been made to reflect returned donations and other factors. [updated Nov 19, 2019 at 3:53pm]

Campaign Finance Reports – 2019 City Council (updated Nov 5, 4:38pm)

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October 30, 2019

Cambridge InsideOut Episodes 429-430: October 29, 2019

Episode 429 – Cambridge InsideOut: Oct 29, 2019 (Part 1)

This episode was broadcast on Oct 29, 2019 at 5:30pm. Topics: Election coming; voter success; dirty politics, warring slates, and inflammatory issues; “Who defines ‘the issues’?”. Hosts: Judy Nathans, Robert Winters [On YouTube] [audio]


Episode 430 – Cambridge InsideOut: Oct 29, 2019 (Part 2)

This episode was broadcast on Oct 29, 2019 at 6:00pm. Topics: dog people; awaiting report; the “gift” of the Foundry; renewable energy, municipal utilities, cost effectiveness; “weaponizing” the issue of campaign donations; shaming as a political strategy. Hosts: Judy Nathans, Robert Winters [On YouTube] [audio]

[Materials used in these episodes]

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