Cambridge Civic Journal Forum

January 17, 2018

Cambridge InsideOut Episodes 283-284: Jan 16, 2018

Filed under: Cambridge,Cambridge InsideOut,recycling — Tags: , , , , , — Robert Winters @ 2:01 am

Episode 283 – Cambridge InsideOut: Jan 16, 2018

This episode was broadcast on Jan 16, 2018 at 5:30pm. The main topic was some ideas about City Council rules and the structure of City Council committees over the last 130 years. Hosts: Judy Nathans, Robert Winters [On YouTube]


Episode 284 – Cambridge InsideOut: Jan 16, 2018 (Part 2)

This episode was broadcast on Jan 16, 2018 at 6:00pm. Topic: Cambridge history of garbage. Hosts: Judy Nathans, Robert Winters [On YouTube]

[Materials used in these episodes]

January 14, 2018

Civic Nerdiness

Filed under: Cambridge,City Council — Tags: , , , , — Robert Winters @ 7:42 pm

Civic Nerdiness

Annual Documents SealThis week on Tuesday, Jan 16 at 2:30pm, the City Council’s Ad-Hoc Rules Committee will conduct a public hearing in the Sullivan Chamber to discuss and suggest changes to the City Council Rules. This committee consists of Vice Mayor Devereux (Chair) and Councillors Mallon and Kelley; as well as Donna Lopez, City Clerk; Nancy Glowa, City Solicitor; Maryellen Carvello, Office manager to the City Manager, and Wil Durbin, Chief of Staff to the Mayor.

I suppose it must be the pinnacle of civic nerdiness to care about the City Council Rules, but the structure of the City Council subcommittees, their mission, the number of members on each committee, and what constitutes a quorum are actually contained within the City Council Rules. From this civic nerd’s point of view this actually is significant. In an ideal world the subcommittees should be where most of the detail work takes place. Unfortunately, it has sometimes been the case that these subcommittees become little more than discretionary devices for their respective Chairs where matters that sometimes have little to do with the purpose of the committee are pursued. In addition, there have been some topics in the last few years that didn’t really have a natural match to any of the existing City Council committees or which were taken up by what might be viewed as the wrong committee. For example, if there is a Transportation and Public Utilities Committee, why were matters relating to bicycle transportation handled within the Neighborhood and Long Term Planning, Public Facilities, Art, and Celebrations Committee? [I would restructure the committees just to shorten the name of that one.]

It’s interesting to look at what the standing committees have been at various times in Cambridge history. Here are a few snapshots, including some recorded in the City’s Annual Documents (yes, I really do have these original books on my shelf):

Joint Committees: 1887
Accounts
Almshouse
Assessor’s Department
City Engineering
Claims
Finance
Fire Department
Fuel
Health
Lamps
Ordinances
Printing
Public Instruction
Public Property
Roads and Bridges
Rules and Orders
Water Supply

Standing Committees
of the Mayor and Alderman

Bonds
Claims
Elections and Returns
Fire Department
Health
Licenses
Police
Roads and Bridges
Sewers

Standing Committees
of the Common Council

Bills in the Second Reading
Elections and Returns
Enrolled Ordinances

Joint Committees: 1911-1912
Accounts
Assessor’s Department
City Engineering
City Home
Claims
Finance
Fire Department
Health
Highways
Legal Matters
Legislative Matters
Ordinances
Parks
Printing
Public Property
Public Instruction
Water Supply
Wires and Lamps

Standing Committees
of the Board of Alderman

Bonds
Cemeteries
Claims
Elections and Returns
Fire Department
Health
Highways
Licenses
Parks
Police
Rules and Orders
Sewers
Soldier’s Aid
Street Railways

Standing Committees of the Common Council
Bills in the Second Reading
Elections and Returns
Enrolled Ordinances
Rules and Orders

City Council Committees: 1938
Americanization and Education

Bonds

City Engineering

City Planning

Claims

Elections and Printing

Finance

Health

Industrial Development

Legislative Matters

Licenses

Military Affairs

Ordinances

Parks and Cemeteries

Public Celebrations

Public Property and Public Institutions

Public Safety

Public Service

Roads and Bridges

Rules and Orders

Soldier’s Aid

Water Supply

Wires and Lamps

City Council Committees: 1998
Cable TV and Communications

Civil and Human Rights

Claims

Economic Development, Training, and Employment

Elder Affairs

Environment

Finance

Food Policy

Government Operations

Health and Hospitals

Housing and Community Development

Human Services and Youth

Ordinance

Public Safety

Public Service

Rules

Sister Cities

Traffic and Transportation

Veterans

City Council Committees: 2000
Cable TV, Telecommunications, and Public Utilities

Civic Unity

Economic Development, Training, and Employment

Finance

Government Operations, Rules, and Claims

Health and Environment

Housing

Human Services

Neighborhood and Long-term Planning

Ordinance

Public Facilities, Art, and Celebrations

Public Safety

Transportation, Traffic, and Parking

Veterans

City Council Committees: 2012
Cable TV, Telecommunications, and Public Utilities

Civic Unity

Claims

Community Health

Economic Development, Training, and Employment

Environment

Finance

Government Operations and Rules

Housing

Human Services

Neighborhood and Long Term Planning

Ordinance

Public Facilities, Art, and Celebrations

Public Safety

Transportation, Traffic, and Parking

University Relations

Veterans

City Council Committees: 2016
Civic Unity

Economic Development and University Relations

Finance

Government Operations, Rules, and Claims

Health and Environment

Housing

Human Services and Veterans

Neighborhood and Long Term Planning, Public Facilities, Art, and Celebrations

Ordinance

Public Safety

Transportation and Public Utilities

City Council Committees: 2018
?????

It’s likely that prior to the adoption of the Plan E Charter that went into effect in 1941 there was either the need or the desire for more oversight of City departments, and both the number and the nature of the City Council (and Board of Alderman) committees seem to reflect this. Some standing committees are essentially permanent (Ordinance, Finance), but others clearly change with the times and even with the desires of individual councillors. What should be the focus of City Council subcommittees for the 2018-2019 City Council term? Should they remain the same? Are there any priorities that warrant a redefinition of the Council subcommittees? Should we revive some committees from the long past?

If you have any ideas, come to the meeting Tuesday afternoon. – Robert Winters

January 9, 2018

Cambridge InsideOut Episodes 281-282: Jan 9, 2018

Filed under: Cambridge,Cambridge InsideOut — Tags: , , , , , — Robert Winters @ 10:36 pm

Episode 281 – Cambridge InsideOut: Jan 9, 2018 (Part 1)

This episode was broadcast on Jan 9, 2018 at 5:30pm. Main topic: Jan 8 City Council meeting – the first for the new councillors; supermarket closure; and more. Hosts: Judy Nathans, Robert Winters [On YouTube]


Episode 282 – Cambridge InsideOut: Jan 9, 2018 (Part 2)

This episode was broadcast Jan 9, 2018 at 6:00pm. Topics: supermarkets, Council committees, partial report card on the 2016-2017 Council. Hosts: Judy Nathans, Robert Winters [On YouTube]

[Materials used in these episodes]

January 7, 2018

Cold Start – Jan 8, 2018 Cambridge City Council meeting (and more)

Filed under: Cambridge,City Council — Tags: , , — Robert Winters @ 11:57 pm

Cold Start – Jan 8, 2018 Cambridge City Council meeting

Cold StartThis first regular meeting of the 2018-2019 Cambridge City Council will be chaired by our newly minted Mayor Marc McGovern. As one might expect, it’s a short agenda as the new and returning councillors settle in. City Council committee appointments may not be settled for a few weeks, so the only business will be what takes place in the regular Council meetings for now. There is one active zoning petition and 15 items from Awaiting Report that were requested to carry over to the new Council.

Here are some agenda items this week that seem interesting:

On the Table #2. A communication was received from Donna P. Lopez City Clerk, transmitting a report from Councillor Craig Kelley, regarding assessing and approving Neighborhood-Based Resiliency. [Tabled on the motion of Councillor Kelley on Dec 18, 2017]

I remember when the term "Sustainability" was first popularized. It took people years to decide what the word really meant with various interested people and groups trying to fashion it in a way that suited their ideals and/or agendas. I’m not really sure what was ultimately decided. Though I have some idea what the term "Resiliency" might mean, e.g. hardening of infrastructure, my sense is that we’re in a place similar to where we were with "Sustainability" 25 years ago. For example, does Alewife Resiliency translate into transit-oriented development with better connections for all transportation modes or does it mean "Don’t build anything there because there may be flooding at times." The current narrow political dichotomy will likely answer in two radically different ways. Soft definitions are always risky propositions.

Order #1. That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to reach out to representatives of supermarkets other than Star Market, such as Market Basket, to determine the possibility of their opening a location at 20 Sidney Street, and to report back to the City Council on this matter.   Councillor Simmons

There has been an active discussion about the store closure on the Cambridgeport listserv over the last few days. Here’s an excerpt of what I wrote there:

The Memorial Drive Stop & Shop closed in May 1994 which left the Cambridgeport area very much in need of a local supermarket. I believe it was in 1997 when University Park (really Forest City) offered to host a Star Market in their hotel/garage building. This was definitely done in order to sweeten the deal in order to obtain the necessary curb cuts (and let’s not forget the discontinuation of Blanche Street). There had been a City analysis of access to supermarkets in the wake of the Stop & Shop closure that informed the University Park decision.

At the time a lot of us felt that the whole concept of a 2nd floor supermarket with paid parking (though a discount was offered) was not a sustainable plan, but there really was a serious need for food access at that time – especially for Area 4 (now The Port) and MIT people who would get there on foot. Some of that logic has changed in recent years as more people live without motor vehicles, but most people who do any significant grocery shopping will choose to drive to a place like Market Basket in Somerville not only for the prices but also because there’s (usually) available parking. It’s virtually impossible that Market Basket would want to operate in the University Park space. It’s completely contrary to their very successful business model in which they own most of the locations of their stores and pay no rent. There are other operators that have a very different business model that might be able to make it work at this location, but only if University Park is willing to negotiate a rent that can make it sustainable.

Though I don’t believe there is any legal obligation that University Park must continue to host a supermarket, I think there’s at least some moral obligation to do so. The original University Park plans called for a "marketplace" that was never built (as well as a movie theater), and some might argue that the inclusion of the Star Market was a sort of making good on that original concept. Perhaps more significantly, the offer to host the Star Market came at a point when the matter was before the Planning Board and the City Council (for the curb cuts), and it was part of the negotiation even if there was no formal commitment to maintain the supermarket in perpetuity. – RW

Back in 1998 I wrote this: "We also learned at this meeting that an agreement has been worked out with the new Star Market at University Park that would make parking for the supermarket free for the first 1½ hours. This was one of the stickier issues a few years ago when the City voted to grant various curb cuts and to discontinue Blanche Street in order to make way for the hotel and supermarket." – Sept 14, 1998 in CCJ Issue #12

Here’s what I wrote on June 16, 2000: "There have also been persistent rumors about just how permanent the Star Market is at that location. For now, at least, it appears to be staying put." Well, it lasted longer than I thought and is now scheduled to close on Feb 3, 2018. Hopefully another supermarket operator can be found and that Forest City/University Park will be willing to offer a long-term lease with terms that can can allow a supermarket to economically operate there. Not everyone wants to shop by bike at Whole Paycheck.

Order #3. That the City Manager is requested to provide an update to the City Council on progress made in regards to the Stated Goals of the City Council, as outlined during the 2016-2017 City Council term.   Councillor Simmons

Goals are important, but the primary goal should be to not spend an endless time talking about them. – Robert Winters


The Upshot: There was a very healthy discussion regarding the future of the supermarket site in University Park. Look for some community meetings to take place in the coming weeks and months.

Mayor McGovern has appointed Councillors Carlone and Kelley as Co-Chairs of the Ordinance Committee.

Mayor McGovern also appointed a Special Ad-Hoc Rules Committee to review the City Council rules and the recommend any changes, including possible restructuring of the City Council subcommittees. This Ad-Hoc Committee will consist of Vice Mayor Devereux (Chair) and Councillors Mallon and Kelley; as well as Donna Lopez, City Clerk; Nancy Glowa, City Solicitor; Maryellen Carvello, Office manager to the City Manager, and Wil Durbin, Chief of Staff to the Mayor. This committee is requested to come back with recommendations in time for the next City Council meeting on January 22.


Jan 1, 2018 – The 2018-2019 Cambridge City Council was inaugurated this morning in the Sullivan Chamber of City Hall. After each elected councillor took the oath of office, the new City Council took care of its first order of business – the election of the Mayor. Though the eventual outcome was already known to many in the room for the last few weeks, there is always at least some drama due to the possibility that an alternate deal could be struck in the interim. However the vote went more or less as predicted with Marc McGovern being elected as Mayor for the 2018-2019 term. The initial vote was 7-2 for McGovern with Councillors Simmons and Toomey casting their votes for Tim Toomey, but Councillor Simmons changed her vote to McGovern to make the final vote 8-1.

After a speech by the newly elected Mayor McGovern that stressed themes of unity the Council then elected Jan Devereux to serve as Vice Chair of the City Council for the 2018-2019 term. That vote was initially 5 votes for Jan Devereux and 4 for Denise Simmons, but Alanna Mallon and then Craig Kelley changed their votes to Devereux to make the final vote 7-2 with Councillors Simmons and Toomey voting for Simmons.

After these proceedings there were several statements by councillors thanking Sandra Albano for her 47 years of service to the City and especially her role managing the City Council office since 1982. Sandy’s last day on the job is tomorrow – Jan 2, 2018 – and it’s hard to imagine City Hall without her.

Perhaps the high point of the entire Inaugural Meeting was Cambridge Police Deputy Superintendent Pauline Carter Wells singing John Lennon’s song "Imagine" – just as she did two years ago and just as inspiring.

Later in the day, starting at 6:00pm, the newly elected 2018-2019 Cambridge School Committee took their oaths of office and elected Kathleen Kelly as the Vice Chair (who will be responsible for making all subcommittee appointments). That vote was initially split with Manikka Bowman and Laurance Kimbrough voting for Manikka Bowman; Emily Dexter and voting for Patty Nolan; and Fred Fantini, Kathleen Kelly, Patty Nolan, and Marc McGovern voting for Kathleen Kelly. Emily Dexter and Laurance Kimbrough then changed their votes to Kathleen Kelly leading to the final 6-1 vote to elect Kathleen Kelly.

Mayor McGovern has tapped Wil Durbin to serve as Chief of Staff of the Mayor’s Office. He also tapped Luis Vasquez to be in charge of constituent services and outreach. Both are inspired choices.

The Plan E Charter only designates the Mayor as Chair of the City Council and the School Committee. All other roles and initiatives of the Mayor and the Mayor’s Office are at the discretion of the Mayor, and every Mayor defines their role differently. Mayor Simmons was a wonderful Mayor for the last two years and our newly elected Mayor McGovern promises to be just as inspiring in how he defines his role for the next two years.

One last note: A new portrait of former Mayor Barbara Ackermann now graces the back wall of the Sullivan Chamber. This was an extra special treat. – RW

Mayor McGovern oath
Marc McGovern is sworn in as Mayor
Mayor McGovern
Mayor McGovern’s inaugural address
Pauline Carter Wells sings "Imagine"
Pauline Carter Wells sings "Imagine"
Barbara Ackermann portrait in Sullivan Chamber
Barbara Ackermann portrait in Sullivan Chamber

The Mayors of Cambridge

January 4, 2018

2017 Cambridge City Council Campaign Bank Reports

Filed under: 2017 election,Cambridge,campaign finance,City Council — Tags: , , — Robert Winters @ 5:20 pm

The following table shows the summary bank reports for 2017 Cambridge City Council candidates. You can sort by any of the fields shown by clicking on the field name – one click ascending and second click descending.

CandidateFromToStartReceiptsExpendBalanceAs OfNotes
Benjamin, Ronald01/01/1712/31/17$9.00$1,426.56$1,432.52$3.0401/02/18
Burgin, Josh06/16/1712/31/17$0.00$23,649.50$23,649.50$0.0001/02/18
Carlone, Dennis01/01/1712/31/17$17,827.87$36,169.32$35,908.61$18,088.5801/03/18
D'Ambrosio, Olivia01/01/1712/31/17$122.75$7,775.31$7,805.69$92.3701/02/18
Devereux, Jan01/01/1712/31/17$8,715.10$55,616.36$50,324.40$14,007.0601/02/18$13672.25 transfers subtracted
Gebru, Sam01/01/1712/31/17$0.00$65,189.04$63,762.17$1,426.8701/02/18loans and refunds subtracted
Harding, Richard07/01/1712/31/17$1,961.06$34,500.49$34,318.46$2,143.0901/02/18$50 returned check deducted
Kelley, Craig01/01/1712/31/17$2,231.84$24,844.39$22,035.58$5,040.6501/02/18$100 returned check subtracted
Lenke, Dan08/16/1712/31/17$0.00$1,248.57$920.00$328.5701/02/18
Levy, Ilan07/16/1712/31/17$0.00$11,664.47$10,913.90$750.5701/02/18$750 loan reimbursement subtracted
Mallon, Alanna01/01/1712/31/17$100.00$54,736.18$49,453.23$5,382.9501/02/18$900 in refunds subtracted
McGovern, Marc01/01/1712/31/17$14,966.66$69,765.59$78,273.58$6,458.6701/02/18$500 returned check subtracted
Moree, Gregg08/16/1712/31/17$0.00$905.22$905.22$0.0012/31/17$174.78 loan subtracted
Musgrave, Adriane05/16/1712/31/17$0.00$34,223.98$33,720.80$503.1801/02/18
Okamoto, Nadya03/16/1712/31/17$0.00$10,947.09$10,586.52$360.5701/02/18
Pillai, Hari07/24/1712/31/17$0.00$0.00$0.00$0.0012/31/17
Santos, Jeffrey06/07/1712/31/17$0.00$12,736.30$12,475.79$260.5101/02/18$116.61 loan subtracted
Siddiqui, Sumbul02/16/1712/31/17$0.00$45,499.60$35,996.51$9,503.0901/02/18
Simmons, Denise01/01/1712/31/17$10,179.79$70,057.20$71,831.27$8,405.7201/02/18$500 excess subtracted
Sivongxay, Vatsady01/01/1712/31/17$0.00$37,905.88$37,872.35$33.5301/02/18
Sutton, Bryan06/16/1712/31/17$0.00$1,229.49$1,208.13$21.3601/02/18
Tierney, Sean02/01/1712/31/17$0.00$31,570.29$29,026.83$2,543.4601/02/18
Toner, Paul02/16/1712/31/17$0.00$86,325.01$79,046.23$7,278.7801/03/18
Toomey, Tim01/01/1712/31/17$4,069.67$70,030.03$47,904.80$26,194.9001/02/18$200 refund subtracted, $18144.68 loan repayments included
Volmar, Gwen06/09/1712/31/17$0.00$12,965.56$12,430.56$535.0001/02/18
Zondervan, Quinton01/01/1712/31/17$3,510.00$60,812.04$62,448.78$1,873.2601/02/18
2017 City Council Bank Reports (updated Jan 4, 2017 at 4:55pm)

Campaign Finance Reports – 2017 City Council (updated Jan 4, 4:55pm)

Vote!

2017 City Council Campaign Receipts, Expenditures, and $/Vote

Filed under: 2017 election,Cambridge,campaign finance,City Council — Tags: , , — Robert Winters @ 4:45 pm

The following table shows the total campaign receipts and expenditures for 2017 Cambridge City Council candidates. You can sort by any of the fields shown by clicking on the field name – one click ascending and second click descending.

CandidateIDReceiptsCambridge% CambridgeExpenditures
(to Dec 31)
#1 Votes$/Vote
Moree, Gregg14683$905.22$905.22100.0%$905.2246$19.68
Devereux, Jan16062$53,659.50$47,753.5089.0%$50,024.401699$29.44
Kelley, Craig14104$25,247.86$20,420.6080.9%$24,705.231092$22.62
Musgrave, Adriane16657$33,998.98$26,060.0076.6%$33,720.80580$58.14
Carlone, Dennis15680$36,169.32$27,325.0075.5%$35,908.611176$30.53
D'Ambrosio, Olivia16520$7,750.00$5,500.0071.0%$7,805.69216$36.14
Harding, Richard16737$34,500.49$22,641.0065.6%$34,318.46836$41.05
Mallon, Alanna16530$54,836.18$35,793.0065.3%$51,092.351329$38.44
Levy, Ilan16173$3,306.86$2,000.0060.5%$10,913.90246$44.37
McGovern, Marc15589$69,729.53$41,981.1960.2%$78,273.581880$41.63
Burgin, Josh16709$24,189.02$14,124.5258.4%$24,104.02392$61.49
Sutton, Bryan16713$1,314.44$719.9554.8%$1,293.0845$28.74
Benjamin, Ronald16493$1,262.55$677.0053.6%$1,432.52242$5.92
Zondervan, Quinton16516$59,406.69$29,149.4249.1%$61,856.361565$39.52
Siddiqui, Sumbul16556$45,274.60$21,795.0048.1%$35,996.512532$14.22
Toner, Paul16576$85,390.87$39,693.2646.5%$104,626.50980$106.76
Tierney, Sean16559$31,620.29$14,400.0045.5%$30,776.83779$39.51
Simmons, Denise13783$70,047.47$29,501.0042.1%$91,716.362616$35.06
Toomey, Tim12222$70,030.03$26,005.0837.1%$34,813.211619$21.50
Volmar, Gwen16691$13,374.56$4,713.9435.2%$12,839.56248$51.77
Santos, Jeffrey16686$10,102.00$3,282.0032.5%$12,582.40147$85.59
Sivongxay, Vatsady16528$37,905.88$11,189.0029.5%$37,933.19740$51.26
Gebru, Samuel16531$65,159.04$18,541.0428.5%$64,024.11787$81.35
Okamoto, Nadya16596$10,189.49$1,235.0012.1%$10,586.52550$19.25
Lenke, Dan16771$0.00$0.00-$920.0054$17.04
Pillai, Hari16770$0.00$0.00-$0.00107$0.00
2017 City Council Campaign Receipts and Expenditures (last updated Jan 15, 2018 at 9:30pm)

Note 1: Campaign expenses will continue to grow as reports are filed and bills are paid. This table will be updated at least semi-monthly through the end of 2017. The $/Vote figures will grow accordingly.

Note 2: Adjustments to the totals have been made (Jan 4) to reflect returned donations, candidate loans repaid, etc.

Vote!

December 19, 2017

Cambridge InsideOut Episodes 277-278: Dec 19, 2017

Episode 277 – Cambridge InsideOut: Dec 19, 2017 (Part 1)

This episode was broadcast on Dec 19, 2017 at 5:30pm. The main topic was a recap of the Dec 18 City Council meeting – the last of the 2016-17 City Council term. Hosts: Judy Nathans, Robert Winters [On YouTube]


Episode 278 – Cambridge InsideOut: Dec 19, 2017 (Part 2)

This episode was broadcast on Dec 19, 2017 at 6:00pm. The main topics were Harvard Square, Central Square, and news around town. Hosts: Judy Nathans, Robert Winters [On YouTube]

[Materials used in these episodes]

December 18, 2017

That’s All Folks! – Featured Items on the Dec 18, 2017 Cambridge City Council Agenda

Filed under: Cambridge,City Council — Tags: , , , — Robert Winters @ 12:40 am

That’s All Folks! – Featured Items on the Dec 18, 2017 Cambridge City Council Agenda

That's All Folks!This will be the last meeting of the 2016-2017 Cambridge City Council and the final meeting for Councillors Cheung, Maher, and Mazen who will soon pass their seats along to Councillors-Elect Mallon, Siddiqui and Zondervan for the 2018-2019 City Council term. It’s been great having Leland Cheung (first elected in 2009) and David Maher (first elected to the Council in 1999) for all the years they served and the wisdom they shared.

Here are some agenda items that seem to rise above the others:

Manager’s Agenda #11. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to the Regulation for Keeping of Honey Bees. [DPH Bees Memo] [DPH Bees Regs]

Unfinished Business #8. An amendment to the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Cambridge on Beekeeping. The question comes on passing to be ordained on or after Nov 6, 2017. Planning Board hearing held on Oct 3, 2017. Petition expires Jan 3, 2018.

This is expected to be ordained at this meeting (or it will expire).
Update: It was Ordained 9-0 as Amended.

Manager’s Agenda #12. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to letter from Leggat McCall Properties regarding the proposed disposition of a leasehold interest in the First Street Garage for parking spaces and the development of first floor retail space in connection with Leggat McCall’s redevelopment of the former Edward J. Sullivan Courthouse building at 40 Thorndike Street in East Cambridge.

Now that the series of lawsuits (that never had a chance) have expired, the redevelopment of the courthouse building is expected to proceed.

Unfinished Business #9. An amendment to the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Cambridge on Innovation Office Space in PUD-3A and PUD-4C Zoning Districts. The question comes on passing to be ordained on or after Dec 18, 2017. Planning Board hearing held on Oct 17, 2017. Petition expires Feb 13, 2018.

This may also be ordained on Monday. The expiration isn’t for some time but there’s really no reason to kick this can down the road.
Update: It was Ordained 8-0-1.

Resolution #6. Retirement of Alessandra "Sandra" Albano from the City Council Office.   Councillor Cheung

Sandy’s tenure dates to the days of Mayor Al Vellucci. It’s hard to imagine City Hall without her. Happy Trails, Sandy.

Update: Here’s the list of city councillors Sandra will have worked with by the time she leaves after the Inaugural meeting.

Alanna Mallon
Alfred LaRosa
Alfred Vellucci
Alice Wolf
Anthony Galluccio
Brian Murphy
Craig Kelley
Daniel Clinton
David Maher
David Sullivan
David Wylie
Denise Simmons
Dennis Benzan
Dennis Carlone
Edward Cyr
Francis Duehay
Henrietta Davis
James Braude
Jan Devereux
Jonathan Myers
Katherine Triantafillou
Kathleen Born
Kenneth Reeves
Larry Ward
Leland Cheung
Leonard Russell
Marc McGovern
Marjorie Decker
Michael Sullivan
Minka vonBeuzekom
Nadeem Mazen
Quinton Zondervan
Sam Seidel
Saundra Graham
Sheila Russell
Sumbul Siddiqui
Thomas Danehy
Timothy Toomey
Walter Sullivan
William Walsh

Order #1. That all items pending before the City Council and not acted upon by the end of the 2016-2017 Legislative Session be placed in the files of the City Clerk, without prejudice provided that those proposed ordinances which have been passed to a second reading, advertised and listed on the Calendar under "Unfinished Business" during the 2016-2017 City Council term, along with any other pending matters on the Calendar listed as "Unfinished Business," shall be forwarded to the next City Council and further provided that any items pending in committee may, at the discretion of the committee, be forwarded to the next City Council.   Mayor Simmons

There’s nothing nicer than a clean slate, and that goes especially for virtually all of the items on "Awaiting Report" – many of which have already been addressed and some of which should have been brushed off long ago. I hope the next City Council exercises more discretion in the demands made of City staff and the wild geese it chooses to chase. – Robert Winters

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